Upcoming BMS Events

September 29, 2016 Boston Public Library William Shakespeare Exhibit 

(This is a general description of the exhibit from the Map Center’s website; details about this specific event will be posted soon.)

William Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies and histories were situated in a number of locations throughout Europe, Asia and Africa. These plays spanned the centuries, from classical times to the Renaissance. In this exhibition of forty maps, images and three-dimensional objects, visitors will learn about Britain in the time of Shakespeare, discover centuries-old maps illustrating where the plays were set, and understand the symbolic role that geography held to the dramas.

Kronborg Castle in Denmark, known as Elsinore in Hamlet, will be highlighted in the exhibition. A 1629 Dutch map depicting the Danish Kingdom, along with a vignette illustrating “Elsenor,” will be on display. Complementing this map will be an original print of “Cronenburg” from Samuel von Pufendorf’s 1696 historical atlas.  Shakespeare’s Here and Everywhere will complement a larger exhibition which will open at the Boston Public Library in October 2016, highlighting the Bard’s first folios.

 

October 19, 2016, 5:30 pm
Boston Public Library, Abbey Room
Peter Whitfield Mapping Shakespeare’s World

November 10, 2016, 5:30 pm
Boston Public Library, Commonwealth Salon
James A. Welu, Director Emeritus of the Worcester Art Museum, will present a lecture about Jan Vermeer’s The Geographer.

No other painter from 17th-century Holland expressed a greater interest in cartography than Jan Vermeer. His detailed depictions of maps and globes coincide with the great age of exploration and mapmaking. This lecture by the leading authority on Vermeer’s use of cartographic material demonstrates that all of the maps and globes in Vermeer’s paintings can be identified, though few originals still exist. These cartographic objects and the ways in which Vermeer used them not only add further meaning to his allegorical subjects and scenes of everyday life; they also shed light on Vermeer’s working method, including his possible use of the camera obscura.

Named Director Emeritus of the Worcester Art Museum in 2011, James Welu joined the staff of the Museum in 1974 as assistant curator and went on to serve 6 years as chief curator and 25 years as director. Born in Dubuque, Iowa, Welu began his career as an artist and taught studio art in college before pursuing further studies in art history.  He holds a BA from Loras College, an MA and MFA in studio art from the University of Notre Dame, a PhD in art history from Boston University. A specialist in 17th-century Dutch and Flemish art, Welu has published and lectured widely and organized a variety of exhibitions, including Judith Leyster: A Dutch Master and Her World. Welu served as president of the Association of Art Museum Directors and chair of the Accreditation Commission of the American Alliance of Museums. He has also served on the advisory council for the Princeton University Art Museum and the Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame and is active in numerous organizations in the Worcester community.

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